Quapaw Area Council
Boy Scouts Of America

Home - Camping - Training - Calendar - Forms - Facilities - Maps - Search

CUB SCOUT
OUTDOOR PROGRAM
GUIDELINES FOR 2003

Tiger Cubs- Cub Scouts - Webelos Scouts
Parents and Families
(#13-631)

Well-planned council- and pack-organized outdoor activities fulfill the promise made to many of our Cub Scouts. Young boys have a natural desire for fun, excitement, and adventure in the outdoors. These experiences encourage them to spend quality time with family and friends. Quality council camps and fun pack outdoor events directed by qualified, trained leaders provide an ideal setting for these activities.

Standards for Privacy on Trips or Outings

To support the BSA policy of two-deep leadership on all trips or outings, we must address the sleeping arrangements of male and female leaders. 

All leaders are expected to reflect high moral standards established by customs, traditional values, and religious teachings. 

Male and female leaders require separate sleeping facilities. Married couples may share the same quarters if appropriate facilities are available. 

Male and female youth participants must not share the same sleeping facility. When tents are used, no youth will stay in the tent of an adult other than his/her parent or guardian. 

When housing other than tents is used, separate housing must be provided for both male and female participants. Adult male leaders must be responsible for the male participants. Adult female leaders must be responsible for the female participants. 

Adult leaders need to respect the privacy of youth members in situations where the youth are changing clothes or taking showers, and intrude only to the extent that health and safety require. Adults also need to protect their own privacy in similar situations. 

Although it is not mandatory, councils are strongly encouraged to have separate shower and latrine facilities for females. In camps where separate facilities are not available, separate shower schedules for males and females should be posted. Use the buddy system for latrine use by having one person wait outside the entrance, or use Occupied and Unoccupied signs on door latches. 

Why Cub Scout Outdoor Activities?

When a boy and his family join Cub Scouting, they are joining an organization that values the fun and excitement of experiencing the outdoors. Each Cub Scout pack is encouraged to provide its youth members with enriching, positive outdoor experiences. This may be a youth member's first organized outdoor activity. With this in mind, the following definitions and recommendations are provided to help assure it will be a positive one.

Cub Scout Day Camp

Day camp is an organized one-to five-day program for Tiger Cubs, Cub Scouts, and Webelos Scouts that is conducted by the council under certified leadership at an approved site, during daylight or early evening hours. Day Camps do not include any overnight activities. 

Approval to conduct a day camp is granted by the council. Certification of the day camp director and program director is provided through the National Camping School. All day camps shall be conducted in accordance with established standards as given in National Standards for Local Council Accreditation of Cub Scout/Webelos Scout Day Camps, No. 13-108.

References: 
Cub Scout Day Camp
, No. 13-33815

Cub Scout/Webelos Scout Resident Camp

Cub Scout and Webelos Scout resident camping is a council organized, theme-oriented overnight camping program. It operates for at least two nights and is conducted under certified leadership at a camp approved by the council. 

Resident camping typically includes the following outdoor program areas: Showmanship, Sportsmanship, Craftsmanship, Waterfront, Fitness, Campcraft, and Nature. 

Each year, councils change their overall theme to offer different adventures. Examples of themes, include Sea Adventure, Space Adventure, Athletes, Knights, Circus Big Top, American Indian Heritage, Folklore, and the World Around Us. 

Certification of the resident camp director and program director is provided through the National Camping School. All Cub Scout and Webelos Scout resident camps shall be conducted in accordance with established standards as given in National Standards for Cub Scout/Boy Scout Resident Camps, No. 19-108.

References: 
Resident Camping for Cub Scouts, Webelos Scouts, and Parents, No. 13-33814
Staff Training and Parent Orientation Guide, No. 13-167

Webelos Den Overnight Camping

Webelos Scout overnighters introduce the boy and his parent to the basics of the Boy Scout camping program. These events are conducted under the leadership of a trained Webelos den leader. In most cases, the Webelos Scout will be under the supervision of a parent or guardian. In all cases, each Scout is responsible to a specific adult. BSA health and safety and youth protection guidelines apply. 

Webelos Scout dens are encourage to visit Boy Scout district camporees and Klondike derbies. The purpose of these visits should be for the boys to look ahead with anticipation to their future as Boy Scouts and observe troops they might join. Webelos Scout dens should not compete against or participate in activities designed for Boy Scouts. Webelos Scout dens should not spend the night as participants at the event if the program is Boy Scout-based.

References: 
Cub Scout Leader Book
, No. 33221B, "Planning the Webelos Overnight"
Webelos Leader Guide, No. 33853B

Additional Cub Scout Overnight Opportunities

Cub Scouts can experience overnight activities in venues other than accredited resident camping. There are two categories of Cub Scout overnighters:

Council-Organized Family Camp

Council-organized family camps are overnight events involving more than one pack. The local council provides all of the elements of the outdoor experience, such as staffing, food service, housing, and program. These are often referred to as Parent/Pal or Adventure weekends. Council-organized family camps should be conducted by trained leaders at sites approved by the local council. In most cases, the youth member will be under the supervision of a parent or guardian. In all cases, each youth participant is responsible to a specific adult.

Overnight activities involving more than one pack must be approved by the council. Council-organized family camps must be conducted in accordance with established standards as given in National Standards for Council Family Camping, No.13-408.

Pack Overnighters

These are pack-organized overnight events involving more than one family from a single pack, focused on age-appropriate Cub Scout activities and conducted at council-approved locations (councils use Site Approval Standards, No. 13-508). If nonmembers (siblings) participate, the event must be structured accordingly to accommodate them. BSA health and safety and youth protection guidelines apply. In most cases, each youth member will be under the supervision of a parent or guardian. In all cases, each youth participant is responsible to a specific adult.

Adults giving leadership to a pack overnight must complete Basic Adult Leader Outdoor Orientation (BALOO) (No. 34162A) and be present on campouts.  BALOO trains participants to properly understand the importance of program intent, youth protection guidelines, health and safety, site selection, age-appropriate activities, and sufficient adult participation. Permits for campouts shall be issued locally. Packs use Local Tour Permit Application, No. 34426.

References: 
A Guide to Safe Scouting
, No. 34416
Camping Program and Property Management, No. 20-920
Basic Adult Leader Outdoor Orientation (BALOO), No. 34162A

Cub Scout Pack National Quality Unit Award

Each Cub Scout pack must achieve six of 10 requirements to qualify for the award. One of the six required is outdoor activities. To meet this requirement, the pack is to participate in one or more of the following experiences: Cub Scout day camp, resident camp, family camping, pack camping, and/or Webelos Den overnighter. 

References: 
Cub Scout Pack National Quality Unit Award, No. 14-220

Cub Scout Trips and Excursions

Trips or excursions by Cub Scout packs under chartered organization leadership are a recognized part of the Cub Scout program. Trips should be conducted in accordance with established procedures. 

Permits for such tours shall be insured locally or nationally, depending on the distance traveled. 

The National Council has established the following guidelines:

It is the policy of the Boy Scouts of America that trips and outings may never be led by only one adult. Two registered adult leaders or one registered adult leader and a parent of a participant, one of whom must be 21 years of age or older, are required for all trips or outings. It is the responsibility of the chartered organization of any Cub Scout pack, Boy Scout troop, Varsity Scout team, or Venturing crew to stress to the committees and leadership of the unit that sufficient adult leadership must be provided on all trips and outings.

Accident and Sickness Insurance Protection

For questions about current camper accident and sickness insurance, please refer to to the latest material sent to Scout executives from the Insurance and Risk Management Service of the Boy Scouts of America.

#13-631
2002 Boy Scouts of America


 Home   Top Of Page   Previous 

Quapaw Area Council - Boy Scouts Of America
3220 Cantrell Road, Little Rock, AR 72202
(501) 664-4780 -- Fax (501) 664-4785
Copyright () 2000-2004 Quapaw Area Council