Stuck at home? Well, that doesn’t mean you can’t do Scouts! Here are some good ideas for activities you can do at home to enjoy Scouting as a family. We’ve arranged them into challenges by group. Have fun!

Cub Scouts

30 Day Challenge

Scouts BSA

30 Day Challenge

Check with your ScoutMaster for approval before starting a new merit badge.

Weekly Challenges

Home Scouting Weekly Challenges

Challenge 1 (click here to open/close)

Tiger Cubs

from the Curiosity, Intrigue, and Magical Mysteries elective adventure (page 108 and following)

  • Do the following:
    • Learn a magic trick. Practice your magic trick so you can perform it in front of an audience.
    • Create an invitation to a magic show.
    • With your family, put on a magic show for an audience.

Wolf Cubs

from the Air of the Wolf elective adventure (page 124 and following)

  • Do two the following investigations to see how air affects different objects:
    • Make a paper airplane and fly it five times. Try to make it fly farther by altering its shape. Fly it at least five more times to see if your changes were effective.
    • Make a balloon-powered sled or a balloon-powered boat. Test your sled or boat with larger and smaller balloons.
    • Bounce a basketball that doesn’t have enough air in it. Then bounce it when it has the right amount of air in it. Do each one 10 times. Describe how the ball bounces differently when the amount of air changes.
    • Roll a tire or ball that doesn’t have enough air in it and then roll it again with the right amount of air. Describe differences in how they move.

Bear Cubs

from the Bear Picnic Basket elective adventure (page 135 and following)

  • Complete at least three of the following:
    • Create your own Bear cookbook using at least five recipes you might cook or prepare either on your own or with some adult help. Include at least one recipe each for breakfast, lunch, dinner and a nutritious snack.
    • With a family member or den leader, prepare for cooking by explaining the importance of planning, tool selection, sanitation, and cooking safety.
    • Select and prepare two nutritious snacks for yourself or your family.
    • With the help of an adult, select a recipe to prepare in a kitchen for your family. Help to select the needed ingredients. Cook and serve your planned meal. Clean up after the preparation and cooking.
    • With the help of an adult, select a recipe to prepare in the outdoors for your family (maybe in your back yard). Help to select the needed ingredients. Cook and serve your planned meal. Clean up after the preparation and cooking.

Webelos

from the Game Design elective adventure (page 387 and following)

  • Complete the following:
    • Decide on the elements for a game as described in your Webelos handbook
    • List at least five of the online safety rules that you put into practice while using the internet on your computer or smartphone. Skip this if your Cyber Chip is current.
    • Create your game.
    • Teach an adult or another family member how to play your game.

Scouts BSA

from the Game Design merit badge (requirement 4)

  • Do the following
    • Pick a game where the players can change the rules or objectives (examples: basketball, hearts, chess, kickball). Briefly summarize the standard rules and objectives and play through the game normally.
    • Propose changes to several rules or objectives. Predict how each change will affect gameplay.
    • Play the game with one rule or objective change, observing how the players’ actions and emotional experiences are affected by the rule change. Repeat this process with two other changes.
    • Document and explain to your counselor how the changes affected the actions and experience of the players. Discuss the accuracy of your predictions.

Tiger Cubs

from the Curiosity, Intrigue, and Magical Mysteries elective adventure (page 109 and following)

Complete requirements 1 and 2 plus at least one other.

  1. (see Challenge 1)
  2. Spell your name using sign language, and spell your name in Braille.
  3. Create a secret code. Share it with your family (or den).
  4. With the other Scouts in your den or with your family, crack a code that you did not create.
  5. With the help of your parent, guardian or other caring adult, conduct a science demonstration that shows how magic works. Share what you learned from your science demonstration.

Wolf Cubs

from the Air of the Wolf elective adventure (page 124 and following)

Complete two of the following (#3 and #4 can be done with your family):

  1. With other members of your den, go outside and record the sounds you hear. Identify which of these sounds is the result of moving air.
  2. Create a musical wind instrument, and play it as part of a den band (when you are able).
  3. With an adult, conduct an investigation on how speed can affect sound.
  4. Make a kite using household materials. With your den or family, explain the rules for safely flying kites. Fly your kite.
  5. With your family, den or pack, participate in a kite derby, space derby or rain gutter regatta. Explain how air helps the vehicle move.

Bear Cubs

from the Beat of the Drum elective adventure (page 151 and following)

  • Learn about the history and culture of American Indians or other indigenous people who lived in your area long ago.
  • Create a legend by building a diorama, writing a story, or presenting a skit.

Webelos

from the Looking Back, Looking Forward elective adventure (page 435 and following)

Complete the following:

    1. Create a record of the history of Scouting and your place in that history
    2. With the help of your den leader, parent, or guardian and with your choice of media, go on a virtual journey to the past and create a timeline.
    3. Create your own time capsule.

Scouts BSA

from the Pets merit badge (a merit badge worksheet may be accessed here):

  1. Present evidence that you have cared for a pet for four months. Get approval before you start.
  2. Write in 200 words or more about the care, feeding and housing of your pet, Tell some interesting facts about it. Tell why you have this kind of pet. Give local laws, if any, relating to the pet you keep.
  3. Show that you have read a book or pamphlet, approved by your counselor, about your kind of pet. Discuss with your counselor what you have learned from what you read.
  4. Do any ONE of the following:
    1. Show your pet in a pet show.
    2. Start a friend raising a pet like yours. Help your friend get a good start.
    3. Train a pet in three or more tricks or special abilities.